Hacienda Concepción

  • Gian Anteater!

    Location: Trail Sandoval Lake | Date: Jun 13th, 2014 | Time: 10:30 am

    On a cloudy morning a group of travelers and I was heading towards Lake Sandoval and around  kilometer one of the Sandoval trail one traveler observed a large animal about 50 meters from where we were standing. As I turned around I could not believe what we were seeing, it was a giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), approximately 3 meters long and about 80 kilos weight, the longest of the four in its specie among the area.
    We were all amazed at the incredible spectacle that we witnessed as this beautiful animal was digging a nest of termites, the giant anteater moved around the colony
    with its huge claws to reach them. Definitely an extremely rare sighting as we had not seen this specie in several years.

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    CarlosTorres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion
  • Eagle!

    Location: Trail Sandoval Lake | Date: April 13th, 2014 | Time: 8:00 am


    One sunny morning while visiting Lake Sandoval Aguila Arpiawith a group of travelers, we had just seen a family of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri fuscicollis) through an opening near the Aguaje palm (Mauritia flexuosa) area, when suddenly I saw a huge bird on one of the highest branches of a dry tree. I could believe my eyes after using the binoculars. It was the most impressive eagle we have in Peru, a harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja). It is not only impressive for its size, but also because it is very difficult to spot, and is also considered an endangered species. This eagle in particular was holding a monkey with its left claw (its legs can be as thick as a small child’s arm). It remained perched on the tree for a couple of minutes, and then it took flight and disappeared among the trees. The experience was amazing because we could all appreciate it and in my case, it is the third time I got to see the harpy eagle.


     

    Carlos Torres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion


     
  • Anaconda!

    Location: Cocha Concepcion | Date: February 6th, 2014 | Time: 10:00 am



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    Around 10am Glhemm and Justo, Inkaterra Explorer Guides, went with their guests to the Cocha excursion. When they returned they told us that they had seen an anaconda (Eunectes murinus) in one of the bushes at the small lake. Due to this a group of Explorers Guides decided to go back to see the snake. Fortunately for us it was still in the same place. We thought it didn’t move because it was digesting something or just basking on the bushes.. We watched the anaconda for more than 10 minutes, as it remained tangled; we did not see its head but after taking a good look at its width and the location of the tail we calculated the anaconda measured between 3 to 4 meters long (huge!). Since it would stay in the same place and was likely not move for a while, we took travelers to see this rare sighting. We were all very excited, considering this type of snake is extremely difficult to observe. We believe that as the river and the small lake increased  its level due to heavy rains in the area, the anaconda migrated towards the lake. It was a very good day at Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion! I share some photos taken of the anaconda. Enjoy!

    Valeria Lozano | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica
  • Black caiman!

    Location: Concepcion Creek | Date: October 3rd, 2013 | Time: 6:45pm




    On the Twilight River excursion with the help of Alan (another Inkaterra Explorer Guide) we observed a rarely seen species of alligator in the Madre de Dios River: a black caiman (Melanosuchus niger). Although we observed the caiman’s head protruding above the water surface, measuring about 70 centimeters long. Calculating the length of his body according to the size of his head (which usually is 7 times longer) we arrived to the conclusion that the caiman was about 4 to 5 meters long from its mouth all the way to the tip of the tail. It was so large that he was not afraid when our boat stopped a few meters away. The caiman stood still for more than 2 minutes and allowed us to observed this reptile in detail: black head,  big eyes, and its mouth filled with sharp teeth. I share with you a photo of the sighting. Enjoy!

    Lizbeth Chávez | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion
  • A giant river otter among us!

    Location: Cocha Concepcion | Date: July 21st, 2013 | Time: 3:02

    While out on the Cocha excursion (oxbow lake) we saw a river otter (Pteronura brasiliensis) on the shore near an Oje tree (Ficus insipida). It walked past our canoe, got into the water and swam towards the other end of the oxbow lake.

    It has been almost a year since we saw otters at the cocha. This is because during dry seasons the water channels that connect lakes across the rainforest (otter roads) are dry. Therefore they choose to inhabit and get food from one lake while waiting for the rainy season to arrive. Being currently in the mid of the dry season, otters are returning and, apparently, this one chose our lake to stay for an indefinite period.

    Carlos Torres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepcion
  • Deer!

    Location: Cacao Trail | Date: June 11th, 2013 | Time: 7:30 pm.

    While doing the Hidden Forest excursion, along the trail towards the cacao plantations, we heard noises coming from the dry leaves a few meters away. We decided to remain silent for a few minutes. We were amazed when we saw a deer (Mazama americana). We could identify it was an adult female because of its size and the lack of horns. This species has diurnal and nocturnal habits; apparently it was looking for seeds, fruits, bushes, and/or leaves. Since it did not ran away due to our presence, we were able to observe this animal for a while. This deer is now protected in Peru therefore the sighting was extra special.

    Carlos Torres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción
  • Puma!

    Location: Concepción Trails | Date: June 1st, 2013 | Time: 7:30 pm. |

    While we were on the hidden rainforest excursion near the Cacao plantations with a group of 2 guests we heard the bushes shaking a few meters from us. We decided to stay quiet for a couple of minutes to see  if whatever was out there would show itself. Oh surprise when what appeared in front of us was a juvenile puma (Puma concolor). This feline is considered one of the most adaptable animals in the continent. The puma seemed to be looking for a good place to rest. Suddenly the puma climbed all the way to the top of a bread fruit tree (Altocarpus altilis) for not to be seen or heard again.

    Simply amazing.

    Carlos Torres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción
  • Tapir

    Location: Cocha Concepción | Date: February 2, 2013 | Time: 7:30 pm.

    While Gabriel, an Inkaterra Explorer Guide, three guests where out on the Hidden Forest excursion (near the remains of the Fitzcarraldo boat) they heard sounds coming from between the trees just a few meters away. They remained silent for a few minutes to see if whatever that was making those noises would come out. For their surprise a tapir (Tapirus terrestris) ,one of the largest mammals in the area, appeared just a few meters in front of them. The animal was about 1.5mts. long and seemed to looking for food (being the perfect season  for the fruit trees they feed on). The guests, as well as Gabriel, were amazed by this sighting since they knew they had been extremely lucky.

    Gabriel Barriga | Inkaterra Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción

     
  • Incredible Night



    Before we began the Hidden Rainforest excursion I talked about how difficult it is to spot big animals at night since they are extremely silent and solitary. But that night the animals proved me how wrong I was. I gave my guests enough information and we took the "Bread Fruit Tree Trail" towards the Cacao gardens. As soon as we entered the trail we spotted a couple of opossums (Didelphis spp.) feeding themselves. After a good sighting we continued our walk when suddenly some leafs moved; I turned as soon as I heard it and an adult tapir (Tapirus terrestris) was standing a few meters away from us eating. We could not believe our luck! Here a picture of our finding!
  • Giant River Otters!!!

    Date: May 20th 2012 | Time: 7:30am | Location: Hacienda Concepcion Cocha

    A clear morning with little sun we, two guests and I, went on the Cocha excursion. While enjoying the canoe ride along the cocha we were talking about the landscape, the bird, the ecosystem, and the varieties of fish, when just before the Fatzcarrald boat wreck we saw 2 giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) swimming.


    This specie is only found in South America and it's included on the endangered species list (due to it being hunted for its skin or because they are considered the fishermen main competitors). They seemed to be a young couple who chose our cocha (pond) to build their den. It was coincidentally in this corner (just before the boat) that the otters came out to make alarm sounds which would indicate that their den is probably near. Fortunately we all got to see the otters clearly until the alarm sounds began and we had to leave.


    - Carlos Torres | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción -


  • Rail, duck, rail, duck?

    Location: Hacienda Concepción lake | Date: July 5th, 2010 | Time: 1:30 pm

    It was Monday afternoon and to relax, I went walking near the Hacienda Concepción oxbow lake. As I came near the small canoe dock (at about 30mts from the shore) I noticed a beautiful praying mantis on a leaf. I took my camera and decided to take some pictures. Suddenly I raised my eyes to change focus and I saw a medium sized bird walking slowly and calmly beside de lakes bank. Was it a duck, was it a rail, was it a never before seen bird. I quickly gave the praying mantis a rest and began to take picture of this bird I've never seen before. After about 20 seconds the bird went flying away into the rainforest. As soon as I got to the hotel I sent the picture to try and identify the animal. I couldn't believe what I heard went it was a sunbittern: Eurypyga helias (very difficult to see but common in the rainforest). It was a great sighting for a great day.

    - Alejandro Montoya -
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