Sightings

Sightings
  • Birding Day!



    Blue-banded Toucanet (Braulio Puma - Ene 2014).docGolden-Headed Quetzal (Braulio Puma - Ene 2014)Semicollared Hawk (Braulio Puma - Ene 2014).doc Our exploration trek began at 5:00am towards the Alccamayo river searching for particular bird species such as the Golden Head Quetzal (Pharomachrus auriceps). At the beginning, the outing was not very good. On route we couldn’t see much because it was still dark but we could hear many signs of birds awaking. We decided to keep climbing and at around 8:00am we had our first big sighting. A Quetzal (easily recognizable due to the color of its feathers) flew in front of us. Lucky for us, the bird decided to rest on a branch very close to us. Suddenly the sighting became even more interesting when another quetzal perched alongside the first one. For a few minutes we got to see them both until they flew into the vegetation. Suddenly, when we were heading back to the hotel, a Blue-banded Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis) appeared and surprised us ;when we finally began to descend we noticed that there was a white-breasted bird of prey far away on a dry tree branch. We took the telescope trying to identify this bird . We could not believe it, we realized it was a Semicollared Hawk (Accipiter collaris) resting in front of us. It was a very good day!Our exploration trek began at 5:00am towards the Alccamayo river searching for
  • Hummingbird!



    It was a rather cold morning in the cloud forest of Machu Picchu; looking for birds with some travelers but we didn’t have much luck. When the excursion was about to end we approached the bird feeders to observe the hummingbirds. Suddenly  I saw a very rare bird. It was a Fawn-breasted Brilliant (Heliodoxa rubinoides). This was the second time I had seen this hummingbird in Machu Picchu ; it was a new register for the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu. We observed the bird throughout the day with other Inkaterra Explorer Guide as well as our resident biologist. Hope you enjoy the picture!!! (Photo by: Jose Luis Lavilla) Jose Luis Lavilla | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • There's a bear!



    Heading back to the Ecocenter from a visit to the Andean Bear Rescue Center, and Inkaterra employee from the Ecology Department told me he had seen an Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus) very exposed across our river bank. It was then that I decided to head back with the guests. Arriving at the heliport we saw a bear cub coming down the rocks on the mountain as it headed near the river. After a few minutes it disappeared into the vegetation. The guests, just like me, were fascinated to see this species in the wild.

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            (Photos by Braulio Puma) Braulio Puma | Head of Explorer Guides Cusco | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Snake!



    Angel Layme and Percy Jauregui were at the Ecocenter when the Public Areas Supervisor, Julio Huaylla, came to inform that he had found a green snake near the NGO ITA office (Inkaterra Association). Since snakes can be very dangerous they took the snake catching  equipment to be able to relocate it.  When they arrived they realized that it was a Dichrours drymoluber snake (or commonly known as “Chicotillo”). They were able to capture the snake and release it without any problems in a remote area. Here we share a picture for you to enjoy our, and the snakes, adventure. (Photo by: Julio Huaylla) Angel Layme | Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Eagle!



    A group of guests and I were walking towards Inkaterra´s Tea House when, across the Urubamba River, I realized that there was a Road Side Hawk (Buteo magnirostris) sitting on a Cecropia sp. Tree. As we watched the hawk we noticed that the birds were very active. Suddenly one of the guests pointed out a big bird flying near the mountain in front of the Tea House. When I used my binoculars I could see that it was a Black and Chesnut Eagle (Oroacetus isidori) flying around the mountain probably looking for food. Then I realized that the birds were so active because of the presence of an eagle flying using the hot air currents. This gave me the chance to take some pictures that I now share with you. Hope you enjoy them! Braulio Puma | Head Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • A day as a Bear!



    At 12:30m Inkaterra staff working near the Vilcanota River reported the sighting of a spectacled bear within the hotel grounds, also known as Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus), walking on the left bank of the Vilcanota River in front of Café Inkaterra restaurant. Fortunately the bear was in sight for more than 30 minutes which allowed staff members and travelers to observe and take pictures of this interesting species. During that time the bear went down to the river, drank water, took a bath, and then climbed a tree to feed on bromeliads. Quite a show. Let’s hope he visits us again! Wiliam Polo | Assistant Explorer Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Spectacle Bear



    Oso Carmen 3Oso Carmen 2Oso Carmen 1 At 3:45 pm. Florentino Candia and Rudy Quiroz, security and logistics personnel at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel respectively, were working near the railroad, when they saw some branches moving on the opposite side of the river. After a few minutes, a spectacle bear (Tremarctos ornatus) appeared from between the branches looking for bromeliads. They immediately reported the sighting to the Ecology and Ecotourism staffs by radio come and watch this interesting species. The bear was 2 years old approximately and looked underweight, due to the dry season that the area was currently going through. The sightings are specially important because we can learn more about the species behavior, eating and breading habits. Carmen Soto | Inkaterra Asociacion - ITA Coordinator | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • River Otter sighting in front of the Hotel

    Location: Urubamba River | Date: March 21th 2012 | Time: 07:00 am

    This morning, around 7:00 a.m., I was ready to go on a bird watching excursion with travelers from casitas 4 and 74. Ready for the walk, we headed to the pool side where usually you can see various tanagers. I explained about these birds and then continued the excursion leading along the River Urubamba where it is possible to observe various species of flycatchers. Perched on an electrical cable, very close to us, we saw an Andean Mot Mot. That was lovely to see. The travelers and I were really enjoying the sight. In order to look for more species, I followed with my binoculars the river side. Suddenly, I looked on the rocks right in front of the Inkaterra restaurant, an animal with a tail, which I eventually identified as a Neo-tropical Otter (lontra longicaudis). I was excited because it was the first time I saw one. I showed the animal to the travelers who were fascinated. We were able to follow the otter while swimming in the river. It was amazing to see him keeping balance in the turbulent waters and then resting on the rocks, until he went into the forest and got out of sight. Neotropical Otter (Lontra longicaudis) Coming from the Lutrinae mustelid subfamily, this species is found in Central and South America, from southern Mexico to Uruguay and Central Argentina. It measures from 50 to 130 cm in length and weights between 5 and 12 kg. Males are smaller than females. Nowadays it is an endangered species. Cecilia Cabrera | Inkaterra Explore Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Blue Banded Toucanet



    On a rainy Saturday morning at 8:20 am. near the gardening  house and orchid trail II, gardeners reported by radio to our ecology personnel the sighting, of what seemed to be a toucanet, but when reaching the site this bird flew off to the top of the mountain. Later that day at 12:45 pm. we heard a rather strange and strong tweet coming from the maintenance warehouse, we went running with our binoculars and cameras, and surprise!, there it was, resting on a “pacaemono” tree branch (Inga adenophylla) chirping loudly, a Blue-banded Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis). This bird is very rarely observed in the area, the staff passing by could not believe that there were toucanets in Machu Picchu.   Inkaterra Explore Guides| Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo
  • Band-winged Nightjar



    The day was sunny and clear, Daniel Aucayllo, Andrés Quispe and Braulio Supa, staff from the ecology team, were working on the Andean bear facilities. Daniel saw something moving on a rock nearby and went to take a look, much was his surprise when he observed a bird rarely seen during the day, a Nightjar resting on top of the lithophytic vegetation (Columnea lophophora). After making the photographic record, that same day in the ecology cabinet the bird was identified as a Band-winged Nightjar (Caprimulgus longirostris) confirmed by Dr. Daniel F. Lane, co-author of the book “Aves de Perú). This specie is more active at night and during the day spends most of the time resting on branches and fallen leaves, and thanks to its feathers it appears unnoticed. Daniel Aucayllo, Andrés Quispe | Inkaterra Staff | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Cock of the Rocks

    Location: Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel| Date: March 13th 2012 | Time: 15:30 |

    Walking around the hotel it's always nice when you are greeted not only by the wonderful staff but by an Andean Cock of the Rock (Rupicola peruviana)!     Joe Koechlin| CEO Inkaterra | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Canada warbler

    Location: Trail System | Date: March 13th 2012 | Time: 15:30 |

    It was a cloudy afternoon, around 3:30 p.m., when the ecotourism group decided to go to the heliport accompanied by Braulio Puma (Leader Explorer Guide) with the only purpose of birdwatching. We started our search of bird species and were able to spot many of them; nevertheless the most remarkable was the Canada Warbler (Wilsonia canadensis) of 13 cm. This species is a common boreal migrant from September to April, to east slope of the Andes at 650-1700 meters above-sea-level. This bird is one of the few you can also see in the Amazonian rainforests, usually with mixed flocks. Canada Warblers have a colorful and notorious yellow plumage around their belly and a dark necklace, less distinct in females and juveniles. Due to the weather conditions we could not continue with the activity. Fortunately we had the chance to shoot some pictures we would like to share with you. Cecilia Cabrera, Jannet Estrada, Jose L.Lavilla, Wilian Polo, Angel Layme, Carmen R.Solis | Inkaterra Explorer Guides| Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Andean Bear Sighting

    Location: Sungate Trail | Date: March 08th 2012 | Time: 11:30 |

    A very quiet morning, around 11:30 a.m., on our way to an excursion with travelers, we were walking towards the Sungate trail. The walk was very pleasant and the weather was sweet. We were talking about the beauty of the landscape and the experience. Every once in a while we made stops to rest. Suddenly, one of the travelers heard the plants shaking in the bottom of the path. All of us turned to look at that very spot, and between the plants a bear cub appeared eating and exploring the vegetation. It was surprising because he showed no fear and got close to us. One of the travelers even mentioned that he looked like a pet we could feed. It was a unique experience for all of us. Andean Spectacled Bear (Tremactus ornatos) Carnivorous mammal that inhabits South America. Nowadays the Andean spectacled bear is an endangered species. Jannet Estrada | Inkaterra Explore Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Canada warbler

    Location: Trail System| Date: March 13th 2012 | Time: 15:30

    It was a cloudy afternoon, around 3:30 p.m., when the ecotourism group decided to go to the heliport accompanied by Braulio Puma (Leader Explorer Guide) with the only purpose of birdwatching. We started our search of bird species and were able to spot many of them; nevertheless the most remarkable was the Canada Warbler (Wilsonia canadensis) of 13 cm. This species is a common boreal migrant from September to April, to east slope of the Andes at 650-1700 meters above-sea-level. This bird is one of the few you can also see in the Amazonian rainforests, usually with mixed flocks. Canada Warblers have a colorful and notorious yellow plumage around their belly and a dark necklace, less distinct in females and juveniles. Due to the weather conditions we could not continue with the activity. Fortunately we had the chance to shoot some pictures we would like to share with you. Cecilia Cabrera, Jannet Estrada, Jose L.Lavilla, Wilian Polo, Angel Layme, Carmen R.Solis | Inkaterra Explore Guides | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Buff Throated Saltator (Saltator maximus)

    Date: September 16th 2011 / Time: 3:45pm / Weather: Sunny

    It was a sunny afternoon, the second day of our bird identification training with ornithologist Zepilli Renzo. The plan was to go on a birding excursion near the hotel. Therefore at 3:45 pm we began the outing at the Ecocentro. As we watched the trees supplied with bananas to attract different bird species, we noticed the arrival of a Blue-neck tanager, and a Palm Tanager (both common to the area). While taking a good look at them, a different colored bird that we initially had mistaken for a female Blue and yellow tanager, appeared. Renzo identified it as a Buff throated saltator! This was the first time anyone had seen the saltator at the Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel hotel grounds, Renzo and all of us, Inkaterra Explorer Guides, took time to observe the bird details for future identification. Finally, once at the office we added the Buff throated saltator as a new bird specie for the hotel. Renzo later explained, using the Birds of Peru Field Guide, that this particular bird is usually found above 1750msnm on the canopy of fruit trees, as well as secondary forests. One more bird for Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel bird list!!! - Cecilia Cabrera, Maria del Carmen Camasa y Renzo Zeppilli / Environmental Interpreter Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel - Close
  • Andean Bear Sighting



     On September 2nd, 2011, between 14h05 and 14h45, the Chilean couple, Mr. Williams Alex Muñoz Vargas and Mrs. Paula Martínez Godoy were having lunch at the main dining room when they observed something was shaking the branches of a tree right in front of the Chaskapata mountain. After a while they witnessed an amazing scenario, a female Andean bear were climbing up to the top of a tree looking for her favorite meal, bromelias. On September 3rd, 2011, at 06h30, the Explorer Guides María del Carmen Camasa and Yanet Estrada were in the middle of the excursion "Birdwatching" when they sighted the same female Andean Bear from the day before and at the same spot. They were impressed to see how the female bear was climbing up and down the soaring and rocky mountain very skillfully in the search of food. In this opportunity the guests enjoyed sighting the bear for 20 minutes. At the end the female bear vanished in the rainforest's vegetation
  • Hawk!

    Location: Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel | Date: November 29th 2010 | Time: 13:00

    It was a cloudy day when the explorer guide Hendrik Torres was returning to Ecocenter and suddenly spotted, perched on a utility pole next to the rooms 48 and 49, a very large bird (about 45cm in height) with the characteristics of a hawk. Hendrik went to the Ecocenter as quickly as possible to bring his camera and take some pictures with the help of another explore guide, Yashira Bejar. Fortunately the bird was still in the same place. The hawk stayed for about 15 minutes "posing" on the pole. While both explore guide took photos they also noticed that different species of birds began to sing in a nervous matter (constantly) and approached the hawk trying to scare it away. At the neginning the hawk could not be identified by Hendrik o Yashira, so they sent an email to Renzo Zepilli (an Inkaterra bird trainer) who immediately responded saying that it was a juvenil Broad-Winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) a boreal migrant (North Amercia) relatively common to the area in this time of year. Hendrik Torres / Inkaterra Explore Guide | Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel
  • Sightings