Say so long to Sushi and Hello to Ceviche as Phil Vickery travels to Peru with ITV’s This Morning

For those who keep up to date with the culinary delights of the world will know that Peruvian food is the up and coming cuisine of the moment. The South American country’s mouthwatering cured-fish ceviches, spicy mashed-potato causas and tender alpaca steaks are going global.

Last week saw Phil Vickery from ITV’s ‘This Morning’ take us to Peru in search of local cuisine that will tantalise our taste buds. Exploring the jungle, heading up higher than he’s ever gone before, Phil cooked with the Kalahari Bushmen and got to grips with some giant crabs. For his first Cookout, Phil headed to the Amazon rainforest deep in the heart of Peru. He met the local Ese Eja tribe, went fishing for piranhas and got a bit too close for comfort with an eight-legged beastie!

Through exploring the local communities, Phil found out about the classic national dish Ceviche, and rustled up his own version on the banks of the river in the Amazon Basin. See below for his recipe to make your own Peruvian Ceviche at home:

Ceviche

  • Take 350-500g of any kind of raw white fish and slice.
  • Mix juice of 3 large limes and a juice from 2 ripe passion fruit juice together and add to the fish.
  • Add ½ a chopped onion and 2 cloves of chopped garlic.
  • Add a small amount of finely chopped ginger, about 1 tbps
  • Top with some black pepper, a pinch of sugar and salt and mix altogether. Leave to marinade for about 10 minutes.

Salsa

  • To make a salsa take 2 large chopped tomatoes, 1 small red pepper & red onion, 1 tbsp chopped ginger, and 1 clove of garlic crushed mix with juice of 1 large lime and 2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil , along with a few sprigs of fresh mint and 1 small chopped, ripe avocado.
  • Season well with salt and pepper.

Whilst visiting Peru, Phil had the delight of staying at two of Inkaterra’s properties; The Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel and The Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica. Through South American Adventure Tours, Phil went on a fantastic eight day tour, which includes visits to the colourful city of Lima as well as the former capital of the Inca’s Great Empire Cusco‘ and the majestic lost city of Machu Picchu. This tour includes two chances to stay at the Inkaterra properties.  South American Adventure Tours state that  ‘Peru is a magical country full of mystic encounters, customs, emotions, adventures and a history that will never fail to surprise you’. Don’t miss out on a trip of a lifetime to explore the wonders of Peru – explore today with Inkaterra and South American Adventure Tours

The Tea Processing at Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel

The variety of tea in the Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel are two: Tea of India and Gold Tea, although each type of tea has a different taste, smell and visual appearance. The tea processing for each of the different flavours consists of a very similar set of methods.

At Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel we cultivate our organic tea free of chemicals so our guests can appreciate quality organic tea. This is the process we take:

We harvest the leaves when the new shoots begin to grow. The collection lasts about a day and new outbreaks are started.

Then they are placed in the dryer. Wilting begins and is intended to soften and make pliable sheets to roll them without breaking them.

The leaf age guideline must be between 25 and 30 days, since this determines the quality in the production of tea.

The damp tea leaves are then rolled to be formed into wrinkled strips, by hand or by using a rolling machine. This rolling action also causes some of the sap, essential oils, and juices inside the leaves to ooze out, which further enhances the taste of the tea. The rolled leaves are placed in a ceramic bowl for a period of 12 hours with a humid atmosphere and a constant temperature of 22 grades.

Drying is the process which aims to stop the fermentation at the desired time. A loose drying process produces a tea high in water and can run the risk of mildew. A strong or long drying process removes the tea aroma, making a large amount of insoluble substances in the leaf.

When completed the process of drying of leaves, the last stage is the selection. The tea leaves are passed through sieves of different sizes that fall in different degrees. The ranking is based on the appearance and leaf size, not the quality or flavour.

Whilst staying at Inkaterra’s Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, make sure to experience these sensational aroma teas, whilst emerging yourself in the timeless spirit of the LostCity of the Incas.

Hungry? Where to eat in Cuzco!

Newly opened in London this month, Lima is a great example of classic Peruvian food. Equally popular is the new patio at Peruvian Chef Gaston Arcurio’sNew York venture La Mar.

If you’re lucky enough to venture to Peru itself, here are our suggestions of the best places for high end palates in Cuzco. Continue reading

Inkaterra and Action Against Hunger

“Against hunger and malnutrition” is the main idea from the campaign carried out by Action Against Hunger‘s Spanish arm, an organization that since 1979 has been active in more than 40 countries in Africa, Asia, South America and Europe.

Between the 15th of June and the 15th of July, 50 of the best gourmet restaurants in Peru will offer special menus and beverages with money going to support the 700.000 children that are suffering from chronic malnutrition and 800,000 from anaemia in Peru. Continue reading

Cocktails at El MaPi – Machu Picchu Pueblo

If you’re in downtown Aguas Calientes to visit Machu Picchu and the surrounding area, why not pay a visit to the buzzy, hip cocktail bar at El MaPi hotel byInkaterra? We have great atmosphere and a delicious range of cocktails using fresh Peruvian fruits and spirits. It’s a great place to meet fellow travellers and lovers of Peru!

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Peru – the hottest destination for foodies in 2012

Frommer’s, the Food Channel, National Geographic and London Confidential all agree: Peru is the hottest destination for foodies in 2012. With two Peruvian restaurants opening in London early next year, Ceviche pisco bar and Lima-London fine-dining establishment, gastro-bloggers are already salivating over the Sino-South American fusion that has marked the cuisine of Peru for decades.

 

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