Cabo Blanco: A Sea Worth Saving

Cabo Blanco

Sixty years ago this week, Louisiana oilman Alfred Glassell Jr. became a fishing legend. In the sea of Cabo Blanco, Peru, on board a yacht baptized ‘Miss Texas’, he caught a Black Marlin that weighed 1560 pounds, a historical record that was filmed for the Hollywood adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea (1958).

Hemingway

As a consequence, Cabo Blanco achieved worldwide fame, to be visited by the likes of Marylin Monroe, John Wayne and Gary Cooper. The sea’s warm weather and location, situated on the confluence of three currents, also made it the only place on the planet with a twelve month fishing season – hence the seven world fishing records achieved during the 50’s and 60’s.

Hemingway aboard of the Miss Texasa

Sadly, an exploitation of natural resources has led to a loss in this marine supremacy for Cabo Blanco, which is why ecotourism pioneer Inkaterra has organised the 1st Conference for Research, Conservation and Development of the Peruvian Tropical Sea. This is part of the company’s aim to support scientific discoveries that will ultimately protect natural resources and boost the enterprises of local communities.

Inka Terra founder José Koechlin Von Stein on board “Miss Texas”

Celebrated from the 2nd-4th August, the congress will include high profile exhibitors such as Rob Kramer (President of the International Game Fish Association) and Professor Nelson Ehrardt (Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric science). The legendary “Miss Texas”, will also be on display on the first day of the conference at the Lima Marina Club, having been fully restored by Inkaterra, before it returns to the Northern Sea for its next great adventure.

Stamps celebrating the 60th anniversary of Glassell’s renowned catch; On sale from 2nd August.

  Inkaterra Stamps

“The tropical sea of Peru is a globally outstanding place for marine biodiversity, including many commercially important and endangered species. The designation of a marine protected area to preserve and restore marine life while ensuring the economic benefits to oceandependent communities by the Government of Peru, would be great news”.

–Terry D. Garcia,

Executive Vice President, Missions Programs of National Geographic Society

Peru Independence Day – Felices Fiestas Patrias!

Peru Independence Day

This weekend marks the celebration of Peru Independence Day. Peruvians throw parties and hold patriotic celebrations to remember the Declaration of Peru’s Independence by José de San Martín on July 28th 1821.  Across Peru, even in remote communities, homes fly the Peruvian flag from the start of July. It is customary for all Peruvian houses, private and commerce  to bear the Peruvian flag and people to bear the Peruvian rosette.

The Peruvian Flag Rosette

On the night of July 27th, Peruvians stage serenatas to both folk and Creole music in plazas and public parks. Dawn on July 28th is greeted with a salvo of 21 cannons in Lima, to herald the ceremony of raising the flag. On the following day, before the famous military parade is held in downtown Lima, the Te Deum ceremony, attended by the president, is celebrated in  Lima Cathedral.

Dancing the streets of Lima

In various parts of the country, Peruvians will be holding agricultural and livestock fairs (Cajamarca, Piura, Monsefú) together with three festivals that are the soul of Creole culture: cockfighting, bullfighting and Peruvian Pase horse exhibitions. This year, Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable freshwater lake in the world, will attract more than 10,000 tourists during Peru’s Independence Day, according to regional authorities in Puno.

Peru is a  proud and independent nation that is famous for its love of fiestas, festivals and carnivals, so it comes as little surprise that across the world people will be marking the occasion. In London, the traditions of Peruvian culture will be alive in the streets of the city with some of the best Peruvian food, artists and musicians throughout the day on Sunday. Pisco sours will be flowing in the city of New York also, with Peruvian food, drink and Latino music on offer in the district of TriBeCa.

Pisco Sours will be flowing in New York City...

At Inkaterra, we’ll be marking the occasion with a celebratory lunch today for all of our staff in Lima, and on Independence Day this Sunday, there will be a fraternal lunch and festive activities across all of our hotels and offices.

How will you be marking the occasion?

Here come the girls: Female Spectacled Bears are welcomed with open paws at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel

Two new females join The Spectacled Bear Project

Two female spectacled bears (Tremarctos ornatus) named Kina and Josi have been welcomed into the Bear Rescue Project at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel. The two bears, who are twins, now have a new place to call home thanks to a collaboration between the Inkaterra Association (ITA)´s representative, resident biologist Carmen Soto at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, the Wildlife Technical Administration (ATFFS), the Attorney General’s Office and the Forest Police.

The local circus

The local circus

Found in a local circus, the bears though docile and well fed by their tamer Ramiro Chávez, were chained to a box that served them as a shelter inside the circus tent. The owners cooperated with the authorities and organised the transfer from Arequipa to Inkaterra’s Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel. Access to Peru’s renowned bear sanctuary is only possible by foot or train, and the Perurail railway company kindly helped the mission, allowing Kina and Josi to travel from Pachar Station to Machu Picchu Pueblo in a special wagon.

Have arrived at the Spectacled Bear Project at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo, Kina and Josi’s quarantine began. After settling into their new home, they were introduced to male resident bears, Yogui, Pepe and Coco. These bears were also found in inadequate circumstances, and now are kept at Inkaterra in a perfect living space for them, with sufficient daily nutrition of fruits and vegetables.

The transportation of the two female bears was a success

Coco, the youngest of the bears (3) was then transferred by rail to a fenced semi-captivity area at Chacra Inkaterra (the Inkaterra green farm) nearby. There, Coco will have a hectare to explore and feed himself from the nearby trees. After forty days, Josi will join Coco for them to get to know each other a little better…

The green native farm at Inkaterra

With a vulnerable conservation status, the spectacled bear is under threat of extinction due to illegal hunting and the loss of habitats due to deforestation and increasing human populations. This then has a negative knock on affect for o ther local wildlife. Spectacled bears have many kilometres of territory and when feeding, spread seeds around their habitat. This contributes to the growth of plants that feed many other species. The disappearance of spectacled bears thereby contributes to the loss of this bountiful ecosystem.

The spectacled bear at Inkaterra

As these bears lose their survival capabilities when under human influence, they cannot return to the wild immediately (in some cases they will not adapt ever again). Inkaterra’s Spectacled Bear Project provides the best conditions for these five bears and is an on-going project towards the conservation and reproduction of these species. With these two new female spectacled bears, there’s hope that more bears will be able to call this place home.

Competition to win Ceviche new cookbook ‘Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen’

We’re pleased to announce an exclusive competition for all our loyal followers! You could be in with the chance of winning a copy of the new cookbook Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen from Ceviche London. For the first time, Peruvian restaurateur and cook, Martin Morales, whose top London restaurant Ceviche opened to enormous critical and commercial success in 2012, shows you how to make the best ceviche and over 100 other Peruvian dishes. This is laid back, fuss-free and delicious Peruvian food.

Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen

Over 500 years of fusion have taken place in Peru for its culinary offering to become what it is today. Starting with the indigenous culture and then blending it with flavours and cooking styles brought over by migrants from Spain, Italy, Africa, China and Japan, Peruvian food has evolved into being one of the most fascinating, diverse, rich and healthy in the world.

Ceviche

From Ceviche’s signature dishes, authentic Peruvian dishes and new creations, Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen cookbook showcases the innovative food coming out of Lima, the Amazon and the Andes today. From sizzling barbecued anticucho skewers, to superfood quinoa salads, juicy stir fry saltados and lucuma ice cream, Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen brings the unique and delicious dishes from Peru to your home kitchen.

Peruvian Cuisine at Ceviche

To be in with the chance of winning this cookbook, all you have to do is tell us why you love Peruvian food in the comment box below. Our chosen winner will be announced in two weeks time on July 12th.  You can also enter via Twitter and Facebook, using hashtag #PeruvianKitchen. Follow us on Twitter @InkaterraHotels and on Facebook here.

With the Ceviche ethos of helping others cook at home, Martin and his team are travelling around Britain on tour. Ceviche Peruvian Kitchen On Tour will run from the 1st to the 15th of July 2013. Tickets are selling fast. Please book your place now to avoid disappointment.

We look forward to hearing all the reasons why you love Peruvian food. Here is some inspiration from Martin Morales himself.

‘There is a Peruvian saying my great aunt Carmela taught me, aquí se cocina con cariño, which means ‘here we cook with loving care’. This is the motto at our restaurant Ceviche – it’s what Peruvian food is all about. The other side of what we do is sazón – the quest to achieve a perfect balance of flavours. I have spent a lifetime working on this. Like most Peruvians, I am obsessed with cooking and I love sharing our amazing food.’ Martin Morales

Anniversary of Peruvian inspired movies Aguirre, Wrath of God and Fitzcarraldo

This year sees the anniversary of two major movies set in Latin America: Aguirre, Wrath of God (1972) and Fitzcarraldo (1982). Inkaterra shares a very special link with the films, as founder Jose Koechlin was the Peruvian producer of both productions. Director Werner Herzog won the Best Director award for the film Fitzcarraldo at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival.

Aguirre, Wrath of God (1972) and Fitzcarraldo (1982)

Fitzcarraldo portrays would-be rubber baron Brian Sweeney Fitzgerald, an Irishman known as Fitzcarraldo in Peru, who has to pull a steamship over a steep hill in order to access a rich rubber territory. The film is derived from the real-life story of Peruvian rubber baron Carlos Fitzcarrald. In the 1890s, Fitzcarrald did bring a steamship across an isthmus from one river into another. The film showcases awe-inspiring scenes from Machu Picchu and the Puerto Maldonado region. It was during this time that Jose Koechlin, founder and president of Inkaterra, developed a strong passion for the rainforest and started looking for somewhere to set up an ecological reserve.

Filming Fitzcarraldo was no easy feat

Koechlin originally went to Herzog with the idea of making a movie about the historical character named Carlos Fermin Fitzcarrald, a man who crossed a ship over a mountain. The idea was to use the film as a catalyst to promote tourism in Peru.

The British Film Institute, in honour of its Anniversary has created a new restoration of Herzog’s extraordinary account of the quest for El Dorado. From its opening shots of an ant-like column of Spanish conquistadors and their enslaved indigenous porters scrambling perilously down through the clouds on a sheer pass in the Andes, it’s immediately clear that Werner Herzog’s account for El Dorado – now newly restored – will be something extraordinary. The movie will be in cinemas nationwide in the UK from today. To book tickets click here.

A Journey with Inkaterra

The great affair is to move

For many travellers, it’s all about the journey. The act of getting from one place to the next is where the fun is. Looking out at passing towns on a train or meandering on a boat through glistening waters gives you time to ponder and reflect on where you have been and where you are going. But gone are the days when boarding a plane gets our adventurous juices flowing, the time has come to explore more unconventional forms of travel.

Here we share with you two of the monumental journeys you can take with us here at Inkaterra that will give you the chance to see some of the remote, picturesque landscapes for which our country is famed.

A train journey from Inkaterra La Casona to  Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo

A train journey from Cusco to Machu Picchu

It’s been said that the train journeys in Peru are some of the most spectacular in South America. Boarding the train in Cusco, you’ll travel along a mountainous backdrop to Aguas Calientes for Machu Picchu. Passengers are treated to jaw-dropping scenery as well as some rather unusual on-board entertainment. There’s even the chance to get some shopping done – watch out for the stewardess modelling some alpaca clothing for sale!

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A boat ride along the Madre de dios River to Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica and Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción 

A boat ride along the Peruvian Amazon

Jumping aboard a long boat at Puerto Maldonado jetty, you’ll set sail along this wide tributary of the Amazon River to Inkaterra Hacienda Concepción and Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica.

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The Madre de Dios River flows through Southern Peru’s rainforest region, the country’s biodiversity capital. With plenty of caymen, birds and turtles to spot, it’s a fun way to start any trip in the Amazon jungle.

Inkaterra launches Walking to Wellness Programme

Walking is the best possible exercise

The human body is designed to thrive in a ‘natural’ environment. It’s worrying then that we’re experiencing the largest global exodus from rural areas to cities in history, with an estimated five million to be ‘geographically cut off from nature’ this year (Spa Finder Wellness Report 2013)With ‘nature deficit disordera new buzz-term, and ‘wellness tourism’ one of 2013’s most salient travel trends, Inkaterra has created an eight night ‘Walking to Wellness’ programme. This incorporates diverse outdoor adventures, daily low-impact exercise, and health-focused spa treatments, taking in Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica and Inkaterra La Casona along the way.

Adventure in the Andes

Guests spend three nights at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel, perfectly located for getting in touch with the Andean Cloud Forest and enjoying nature at its most exuberant.  The programme includes a selection of treks, including a two-hour hike along the Vilcanota River, a staggering walk through the Mandor Valley and a climb up Machu Picchu to the Citadel.   Guests are guided on a botanical walk through Inkaterra’s own native orchid garden and up to the hotel’s organic tea plantation to taste the camellia sinensis tea produced on site.

Our Twilight Walk at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel

Spa treatments at the hotel’s Unu Spa are included, and have been chosen for their health-boosting qualities.  Drawn from traditional Andean techniques, Inka Purification starts with a lymphatic drainage massage using Coca leaf, an essential element of traditional Andean medicinal rituals. The purification ends with an Andean Sauna where stones are heated in a candle-lit eucalyptus hut in the forest.

UNU Spa at Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel

For weary walkers, an Andean Foot Therapy, using local herbs and flowers will improve circulation, whilst a De-stress Massage will alleviate tension and anxiety.

Active in the Amazon

Next stop on the Walking to Wellness Programme is the luxurious Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica lodge near the Tambobata National Park. Only accessible via a 45-minute boat ride along the Madre De Dios River away from the city of Puerto Maldonado, it is a gateway to one of the world’s most remote rainforest environments.

On the banks of the Madre De Dios River

Guests will spend three nights in luxurious cabañas, and by day be encouraged into the wild on a series of walks, treks and hikes.  These include an exploration of jungle trails, a trip to Lake Sandoval to spot the endangered Giant River Otter and pre-historic hoatzin bird, then hike to Gaminata Creek, home to piranha, caiman and turtles. The programme also incorporates a rainforest night walk and a climb up the mighty Inkaterra Canopy Walkway .

The Canopy Walkway at Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica

Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica’s Ena Spa will offer those on the Walking to Wellness programme an Amazon Exfoliation treatment to promote circulation and eliminate impurities, as well as an Amazon Purification using local medicinal plant ‘Cat’s Claw’ or ‘Uncaria Tomentosa’, to purify and cleanse.

The Ena Spa at Inkaterra Reserva Amazonica

Uncover Cusco and The Sacred Valley of the Incas

The programme concludes with two nights at Inkaterra La Casona, a XVIth century colonial mansion in the heart of Cusco. From here Inkaterra guests can visit the Sacred Valley of the Incas to experience the area’s staggering limestone plateaus, natural sinkholes at Moray and ancient salt springs at Maras.

Visit The Sacred Valley, staying in the heart of Cusco at Inkaterra La Casona

Back at Inkaterra La Casona, spa treatments include a Yacu therapy, which uses local river stones including Serpentine, an Andean gemstone. The stones are bathed in warm water and anointed before being placed on the body to promote inner peace and inspire long life.

The programme costs from USD $ 4,070 (approx. £ 2,612) per person in a double room, and includes accommodation, excursions and spa treatments. Meals are also included and healthy menu options are available throughout.  Accommodation is based on double occupancy, superior room category. International and domestic airline tickets are not included but can be organised upon request. For more information on this package please visit our contact us page on our website here

Inkaterra celebrates the Year of the Quinoa

2013 The Year of Quinoa

The United Nations recently declared 2013 “The International Year of the Quinoa,” and in celebration, we’re sharing a recipe of one of our most popular breakfast dishes: Quinoa pancakes.

A traditional Andean superfood

Quinoa is a highly versatile, gluten-free grain native to the South American Andes and is known for its great nutritional value, as well as its good taste. Over the years its popularity has grown world-wide and today quinoa is commonly known as one of the world’s most popular “superfoods.”

The year of the Quinoa

The quinoa pancakes, among other quinoa delights served at Inkaterra properties, are prepared using traditional Peruvian ingredients and techniques, and the quinoa is purchased local from Andean farmers as part of Inkaterra´s commitment to Sustainable & Social actions. They are a delicious and healthy breakfast dish – the ideal meal before a day of hiking up to Machu Picchu, exploring the many wonders of Cusco or trekking through the Peruvian Amazon.

Quinoa Pancakes

Why not make some yourself? Try out the recipe which has come straight from the Inkaterra kitchen. Share your images with us on twitter at @InkaterraHotels with hashtag #yearofquinoa

QUINOA PANCAKE

INGREDIENTS:

• 1 ½ cups of flour
• 2 eggs
• 5 tablespoons sugar
• Pinch of salt
• 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
• 1/4 teaspoon Pisco or brandy
• Approximately ½ cup milk
• 5 tablespoons previously cooked quinoa
• 1 1/2 tablespoons melted, unsalted butter
• 2 teaspoons baking powder

PREPARATION:

• Mix eggs, sugar, salt, vanilla extract, pisco, milk and the melted butter.
• Mix the flour and the baking powder separately and then add slowly to the wet mixture until it becomes soft.
• Add the previously cooked quinoa, and add milk if the mixture is too dry.
• Sautee the final mixture in a non-stick frying pan.
• Serve with maple syrup or honey.
• Provecho!

Inkaterra Photo Contest 2013 – First Quarter Winner

The Winner of the First Quarter Inkaterra Photo Contest 2013

We received some incredible entires for our first quarter photography contest, all of which were taken at one of our Inkaterra properties.We are pleased to announce the Winner of The Inkaterra Photo Contest for the First Quarter of 2013. Jesús Glhemm Ccari took this incredible image while on location at Inkaterra Reserva Amazónica. Congratulations Jesús! View all our photo entries on our Pinterest profile.

The Inkaterra Pinterst Profile

Birding Rally Challenge: Exclusive Interview with Guy Kirwan from The Forest Falcons


Ahead of the next Birding Rally Challenge taking place in northern Peru this June, we’re proud to present this exclusive interview with Guy Kirwan, who was part of the UK team ‘The Forest Falcons’ that participated in the inaugural challenge last autumn.
Guy is an ornithologist and editor currently based in Norwich, UK, and working for Lynx Edicions on the HBW Alive project. He has edited or co-authored more than 30 major books. Since the mid 1990s he has been working intensively throughout South America and the Caribbean, living in Brazil for almost seven years, researching the taxonomy and breeding biology of birds, especially in the Atlantic Forest, Amazonia and the Greater Antilles.
 Photos taken by his team member Alex Lees 
Guy Kirwan

1. Where did your bird watching passion begin?

I grew up in North West England and can pretty much date my interest to a single event, seeing a summer-plumaged Great Crested Grebe on a local reservoir. Fortunately, I had a father who not only could identify the bird for me, but had a genuine interest in natural history in general. He certainly nurtured my love of birds, but never attempted to form it on my behalf, and took me on many trips to see birds throughout Britain.

2. The first BRC in association with ITA was a huge success. What was your highlight moment?

I think I can speak for the entire UK team in saying that our undoubted highlight of the whole event was watching a family of Spectacled Bears close to our hotel in Machu Picchu on the last morning of the rally. We’ll never know whether our spending an hour watching the bears cost us victory in the rally itself (we lost by three species, having been level-pegging with one of the North American teams overnight), but we were all in total agreement that it was worth it! So, I guess none of us will ever make Olympians with that attitude.

Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus) cub

3. The Tambopata Amazon reserve is an incredible place for bird watching enthusiasts. How many species did your team specifically spot during the BRC 2012? 

Our overall total during the rally was 490 species, of which we recorded 326 species during our three days in the Amazon. This included a single-day total of 239 species on the last of those three days, which is even more remarkable given that we did not enter dry-land tall forest until midday. Terra Firme forest is the most bird-rich general habitat type in the Amazon.

The Saffron Crown Tanager (Tangara xanthocephala) and Inca Terns (Larosterna inca)

4. Birds aside for a moment, were you lucky enough to spot the Spectacled Bears that are found in the grounds of Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel?

Indeed, we were and it might also be mentioned that I think all of the six teams participating in the rally saw at least one bear during their stay at the Inkaterra Machu Picchu Pueblo Hotel. Simply incredible.

The final score of the BRC 2012

5. What are your top three countries for bird watching in the world?

Anywhere with some Amazonian forest really, so Peru’s scoring pretty highly, although I have only visited a handful of times. I have been hugely fortunate to spend a huge part of the last two decades in the New World tropics, from Mexico and the Caribbean all the way south to Argentine and Chilean Patagonia. A special focus during this period of my life has been Brazil, where I have spent approximately eight years in the field. I have to say that it is probably my favourite birding destination in the world. Another very special place in my heart is Turkey, where I spent several years working on conservation of wetland birds and habitats, travelling throughout the country and eventually writing a monograph to its birds. I always enjoy going back there and, of course, Istanbul is one of the great cities in the world, alongside Rio de Janeiro. My final choice is rather harder to make, but Cuba is a country that has fascinated me for more than a decade and constantly manages to lure me back, perhaps because I have still yet to see a Zapata Rail, much less an Ivory-billed Woodpecker. The staggering landscape and seabirds of Alaska will also see me return soon too.

Elegant Tern (Thalasseus elegans), Cabot's Terns (Thalasseus acuflavidus), Black Skimmers (Rynchops niger), Franklin's Gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan)

6. Any tips for bird watching novices coming to Peru?

Number one must be, employ a local guide. Peru is one of the most diverse countries in the world, but birds are not always easy to see. Even vastly experienced birders will often find that a local guide is a big help, but for a novice they must be nigh-on essential. Number two, spend some time learning the birds before you come. Even ten years ago that would have involved an incredible amount of homework. It’s still not easy, simply because there are so many birds. With the excellent field guides you can purchase, namely ‘The Birds of Peru’ by Thomas Schulenberg, and online sound archives like xeno-canto (www.xeno-canto.org) it’s a lot easier than it used to be! My final recommendation, which holds for anyone be they a birder or not, is to learn some Spanish before you come. You’ll certainly enjoy your visit so much more.

7. With the next BRC heading to Northern Peru, do you have any birding expectations/species you are expecting to spot with this new location?

Northern Peru is an incredible birding destination; undoubtedly one of the finest in the world, jam-packed with hundreds of birds and many special endemics with highly localised distributions. Some are among the most charismatic and most-wanted birds in the world, with names to match their appearance, like Marvelous Spatuletail (one of the world’s most extravagantly-plumaged and rarest hummingbirds), Long-whiskered Owlet (a very poorly known nocturnal bird that hardly anyone had seen until a few years ago) and Pale-billed Antpitta (a magnificent denizen of the understorey that is very hard to spot). I am not sure how many of these we’ll get to see this time; fortunately I’ve seen a great many of the region’s key birds on previous visits to this part of Peru. We’ll see how we get on…

The Forest Falcons

8. How will the next two BRCs differ from the first one?

The northern rally is going to be a lot more vehicle-based. It’s going to be interesting to see how well this works, but I am sure all the teams will embrace the concept once we are on the ground and running (or should I say driving). We haven’t seen the format for the third rally yet, but I suspect that it will be closer to that in the 2012 event, which we all felt was a great success.

9. How do you prepare for the Birding Rally Challenge & what are your must have items for the rally?

Surprisingly, preparation was rather minimal last time, and might be again for this June’s event, especially as the UK team seems to be permanently scattered over about half of the globe. Mainly, I’ll try and listen to a few more sound recordings of birds I haven’t heard for a long time. Must-have items (beyond the obvious, binoculars) include one or two telescopes between the team and most importantly, recorders and iPods with pre-recorded birdcalls for playback. The best preparation, of course, would be to go out and do the same route a week in advance; it’s not like running a marathon, where covering the same distance combined with the same weather and terrain might suffice. You can’t really practice for birding in Peru where I live in Norfolk.

The Inkaterra Bird Watching Pack

10. Do you have any go-to magazines, websites or blogs that you read that keep you up to date with birdwatching news across the world?

I’m something of a traditionalist, so magazines and journals are still very important to me (especially as I am an editor in ‘real life’). I subscribe to all of the following: British Birds, Dutch Birding, Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, Cotinga and Neotropical Birding, Bulletin of the African Bird Club, Forktail and BirdingASIA ,and Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia. I regularly look at Surfbirds and BirdForum. Birders are also great users of Facebook.

Keep up to date with the latest from the next Birding Rally Challenge 2013 here and on our Twitter and Facebook.